Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

This Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy is absolutely the best pork loin recipe I’ve ever made! Tender pork loin, cooked with wine, garlic and herbs, then sliced thin with a beautiful gravy. This pork is easy enough for any night, but also a company worthy dinner dish!

Let’s face it. We all need a break from chicken once in a while. So I think pork. It’s the other white meat. But pork, true … is sometimes a little boring. Well not any more! If you’re not one already, this dish will turn you into a pork lover. I guarantee it. It’s the best pork loin recipe!

But first, a little pork cut refresher …

What is the difference between a pork loin and a pork tenderloin?
Most people are familiar with pork tenderloin. It’s the small, long, thin and boneless cut of pork that’s popular for it’s quick cooking and a lovely tender meat. Pork tenderloins come from the side of the animal.

A pork loin is different from a pork tenderloin. While it shares the “loin” name, it is a completely different cut and comes from a different part of the animal – the back. Pork loins are larger and thicker. Pork loins are roasts, intended to be be cooked low and slow. Because the loin (back) area is large, there are several different loin cuts that you will find at the grocery or butcher, depending if the roast is cut from the end or the center.

Probably the easiest way to understand the difference is to think of pork the same way you think of beef. Pork tenderloin is equivalent to beef tenderloin – small, tender and meant to be cooked hot and fast. Pork loin roasts are like beef roasts. There are a number of types of roasts, depending on where the cut is from and which one you use will depend on what you are making.

Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

I made this with a small, center cut pork loin roast. Look for a pork loin roast that is labeled “center cut”. It is lovely solid, tender meat, with little to no fat in the meat itself. Think of it as the equivalent to a sirloin beef roast. Nice when you want a solid, tender slice of pork. Look for one with a little bit of a fat cap (1/2-inch or so) is nice, if you can find that, as it will keep the meat moist and add great flavour to the gravy.

I you prefer, you could use a pork tenderloin or two for this recipe (and it would cook much more quickly, too). You’ll want about 2 lbs. of either. There’s also fresh herbs and while I’m usually flexible with swapping out dried herbs for fresh, this is one recipe where you really want to use fresh. When you smell it cooking, you’ll understand why. Heavenly! And there’s no way that dried herbs can compete with that. It’s worth it just for the smell while it’s cooking, but the way they flavour the meat and the finished gravy is one of the nicest parts of this recipe.

Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

Cook’s Notes for Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

I know some people don’t have, drink or cook with wine. If that describes you, this may not be the recipe for you. It has a lot of wine in it and it’s so critical to the flavour, I honestly can’t think of a suitable substitute. This one is all about the wine and fresh herbs.

As for the wine, use a decent one (maybe not the part-bottle that’s been at the back of the fridge for a few weeks and yes, I’ve been guilty of doing that ;) Crack open a fresh bottle, one you love to drink. My son, after tasting this dish, thought a California chardonnay would be a perfect choice. Since he’s the budding sommelier in the family, I’d take that as a solid recommendation, if you don’t already have a favourite white wine you’d like to use.

So now that I’ve said all that, I guess it’s obvious that this isn’t a quick, weeknight meal. That said, it’s not a huge time investment either. It does require peeking at it a few times as it cooks on the stove-top, but other than that, it’s an easy one-pot meal. It’s perfect for a weekend dinner or entertaining.

As for what to serve with it, creamy mashed potatoes would be nice or buttered noodles. I’m tempted to try it with gnocchi too, for some reason. Or forgo the carbs and just enjoy it with a nice green veg.

Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: pork loin recipe for entertaining, pork loin with gravy, recipe for pork loin
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
Servings: 8 people
Energy: 303 kcal
Author: Jennifer
Pork loin (or tenderloins) cooked on the stove-top with wine and herbs, then sliced and served with a delicious, lightly creamy gravy. If using a pork loin roast, look for one with a little bit of fat. For pork tenderloins, be sure to trim the silverskin before cooking.
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Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil
  • 5 cloves garlic peeled and sliced in half lengthwise
  • 2 Tbsp fresh rosemary leaves chopped
  • 1/4 cup fresh sage leaves roughly chopped
  • 2 lb center cut boneless pork loin (or two 1 lb. pork tenderloins)
  • 1 1/4 cups dry white wine (plus a bit more to deglaze pan)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth or stock
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream (or a lighter cream mixed with 2 tsp. cornstarch)

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Saute the garlic, rosemary and sage, stirring, for about one minute. Add the pork loin to the pan, carefully placing it on top of the herbs. Saute the pork for about 5 minutes on each side, then remove it to a plate. Add the wine to the pan and use a wooden spoon to scrape the bottom of the pan. Cook until the smell of the alcohol has disappeared, about 1 to 2 minutes.
  2. Lower the heat under the pan to low-medium heat. Return the pork to the pan and season with salt and pepper. Partially cover with a lid and cook for about 1 1/2 hours (probably less if you're using pork tenderloins), flipping the pork and scraping the bottom of the pan every 20 minutes or so. Keep an eye on it, making sure there continues to be some liquid in the pan. Add 1/4 cup of warm water if necessary.
  3. When the pork is cooked through (if you want to test with a thermometer, it should be about 140-145° internal temperature.) Remove pork to a cutting board to rest and cover with loosely with a sheet of aluminum foil to help retain the heat while it rests. 

  4. Meanwhile, increase the heat under the liquid in the pan to medium. If your pan has little liquid, deglaze with a splash of white wine. Stir well to loosen the browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Allow to cook until the alcohol smell disappears (about 1-2 minutes). Add the chicken stock and stir to combine. Heat over medium heat a few minutes, to allow the chicken stock to heat through a bit. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add the cream. Heat gently over medium-low heat, stirring the sauce constantly, until it thickens a bit and is warmed through. Avoid vigorously boiling. A gentle simmer is fine. (*If your sauce doesn't thicken up, mix 2 Tbsp. cornstarch with 2 Tbsp. water and add a bit at a time to your sauce until it thickens to your liking.) Taste sauce and add salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste.

  5. When the sauce is ready, slice the pork very thinly and place on to a serving platter. Pour the warm gravy over-top to serve.

Recipe Notes

Be sure to read the "Cook's Notes" in the original post, for more tips, options, substitutions and variations for this recipe!

 

More Pork Loin Recipes from Seasons and Suppers

 

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This recipe uses a Dutch oven. A Dutch oven is just a fancy name for a large, heavy-bottomed pot. The heavy bottom is perfect for dishes that will cook a long time, as it prevents scorching. Typically, Dutch ovens are cast-iron or enameled cast iron. They are usually stove-top and oven safe. My Dutch oven is one of the most used pots in my kitchen, but you don’t have to spend a lot to add a great one to your kitchen as well. Here are some great, affordable Dutch oven options …

Disclosure: Seasons and Suppers is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

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294 Comments



  • I plan on making this next week for a dinner party. The guest of honor is a big fan of mushrooms. Do you think Chantelles or Criminis would work in this recipe?

    • Hi Jennifer, I think mushrooms would work well with these flavours. I would definitely cook them separately though and add to the gravy at the end. Enjoy!

    • Hi Renae, the unique method of cooking here doesn’t translate well. It cooks semi-covered, so roasting would be a different, drier heat and the herbs/moisture would probably brown or burn on the bottom of the pan, as it would evaporate too quickly. You could try a skillet on the stovetop, but you would need to “tent” it somehow, perhaps with foil. You want the moisture to stay around the roast, but not completely. Hope that helps.

  • Any tips if I’d like to use left over pork loin slices for this meal? Will it work? I obviously wouldn’t have to let them cook as long since they’re already done, but how long would they cook? Or maybe this isn’t the best recipe for reviving left overs…

    • Hi Beth, It’s maybe not the best recipe for left-over pork, but if you wanted to give it a go, I would just try to replicate the gravy (without the pork loin) and then add your left-over pork right at the end to warm and lend a little flavour to the gravy. So just start by cooking the garlic in olive oil, add herbs, wine, stock. Simmer/reduce. Add cream. Then add your pork slices to warm. Suspect it might work out ok :)

      • Thanks! I tried and and it was ok, but not the best. I was trying to spice up leftovers a bit so it was good for doing that, but it would be much better as your original recipe. :)

  • I am cooking this right now. I think it is perfect alone without any sides, but what is your opinion on doing baked sweet potatoes as a side dish to go along with it. My fiance is a fan of side dishes so I had to come up with some.

    • Hi Jennifer, I love baked sweet potatoes and I think the flavours would be nice together. I tend to usually go with rice or mashed potatoes, myself, to make best use of the gravy :)

  • I made this recipe several weeks ago and it was amazing. I thawed out a frozen pork loin to make it again, but realized I wouldn’t have time to do it.

    I put it in the crock pot on low for 6 hours and it turned out amazing as well. I seared the pork and laid it on a bed of thyme and rosemary (the hubs bought the wrong herb) and garlic. Dumped some white wine in there and let it go to town.

    The taste was delicious, and the pork just fell apart. So great!!!

    • Hi Monika, I don’t think marinating is necessary. Pork loin is lovely and moist (as long as it’s not over-cooked :). And the sauce has lots of flavour, that cooks into the meat as well.

  • This looks fantastic! I have red wine though. Would that be an okay substitute for the white wine or would it mess with the flavors?

    • Hi Noel, I have never tried it with red wine, but my feeling is it would mess with the flavors. I would probably stick with the white wine.

  • I was wondering if I can do this in my crock pot? I have the ninja which also has the stove top option so I can follow it exactly – just wondering if I can then use my crockpot setting on slow cook and if so for how many hours on slow? Likely 8?

    • Hi Lydia, The pork cooked per the recipe never gets covered. If you were to cook it covered for a long time in a slow cooker, you would end up with a very different piece of pork. It probably wouldn’t be sliceable. It would just fall apart. If you are looking for sliceable, I wouldn’t go the slow-cooker route.

  • I am in the process of making this right now. The pork is simmering with the herbs and wine as I type. How simple the ingredients and the prep. This is my Easter supper to bring to work on my hospital shift and I am eager!

  • I’m planning on making this tonight! I do have a question, the pork that I bought is tied with kitchen twine. Should I take that off before searing the meat and putting it in the oven? Or should I leave it on? Thank you! Will report back how it was.

    • Hi Hannah. Is it a pork loin or another cut? Usually when it is tied with twine, it is not a solid piece of meat, but rather a longer or irregular shaped piece of meat that is rolled and tied. If you think that’s what it is, keep the twine on while you cook it. If it looks solid (and that the twine is not really holding it together, then take it off. I’m guessing it’s the first though, otherwise, there would be little point in the twine. If you leave the twine on, then remove only to cut after the pork is cooked and has rested.

  • Sounds like the way to go! So this is what the ladies will be lunching on (and a lot of wine?). I’ll stop back and let you know how it goes.

  • Hi Jennifer, I would like to make this for a luncheon I host every Christmas time for 25 women. It is a sit down luncheon so I need to have everything made ahead (day before at least) and kept warming in chafing dishes. How do you think this would do cooked the day before, refrigerated overnight then warmed the next day? Any pointers?

    • Hi Marla. I think it would do just fine. I would prepare as stated, except undercook your pork slightly. Then store the pork (whole) separately from the sauce. Wrap the cooled pork well and refrigerate and refrigerate the sauce. When ready to serve, warm the sauce in a sauce pan and heat the pork in a 350ish oven covered with foil until warmed through (probably only 30 minutes or so, if pork is not cold from the fridge, so be sure to take out of the fridge ahead to take the chill out of it). Add warm sauce to your chafing dish, then slice warm pork and place over-top. Should be just fine :)

  • Can’t wait to try this recipe! Not sure if this question has been asked, but do you think a dry RED wine would do ok? Or should it really be white? Thanks so much!

  • When I saw this recipe combined some of my favorite ingredients, rosemary and white wine, I just had to make it, and I’m so glad I did. Thanks for suggesting and insisting on using ‘fresh’ herbs.
    I had not used fresh sage before, and I am SOLD, nothing else will do! The flavors in this go together so well. This will definitely become a regular dish in my household. Everyone loved it!

  • We buy pork loin all the time… usually for under $2 a pound! BJ’s sells whole ones & Kroger sells halves. They are, by far, the best meat value on the market! I just hope that they don’t catch on so much that the price goes up!!!
    I usually cut several 1″ steaks, for grilling (AWESOME!) and leave 2 pound roasts for ‘something fancier’.
    As a long-time fan of pork loin, your recipe sounds PERFECT, for ‘something fancier’!
    I can’t wait to try it. I’ll keep you posted, when I do.

    • Hi John! I totally agree about pork loin being the best meat value going (and I’m whispering that, so the price-setters don’t catch on ;) I am pretty sure you will love this dish. I have served it many times when entertaining. It’s so moist and flavourful. A lot of people have though it was chicken! The fresh herb/wine gravy is delicious, too. I could pretty much drink it :)

  • This looks incredible! I have mine cooking on the stove right meow. I went with the gnocchi like you recommended.
    Can not wait to taste it, my house smells amazing!!!

  • My My My this looks amazing! I’m not a pork lover, or eater, but I think your 100% right, this recipe could really change my mind. My mouth is watering….

I love hearing from you, so if you have a question or something isn't quite clear, I'm happy to help. If you made this recipe, I'd love to know how you liked it ~ Jennifer

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