Absolutely the best pork loin recipe I’ve ever made! This Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy is cooked with wine, garlic and herbs, then sliced thin with a beautiful gravy. This pork is easy enough for any night, but also a company worthy dinner dish!

pork loin with wine and herb gravy sliced on platter

Let’s face it. We all need a break from chicken once in a while. So I think pork. It’s the other white meat. But pork, true … is sometimes a little boring. Well not any more! If you’re not one already, this dish will turn you into a pork lover. I guarantee it. It’s the best pork loin recipe!

But first, a little pork cut refresher …

What is the difference between a pork loin and a pork tenderloin?

Most people are familiar with pork tenderloin. It’s the small, long, thin and boneless cut of pork that’s popular for it’s quick cooking and a lovely tender meat. Pork tenderloins come from the side of the animal.

A pork loin is different from a pork tenderloin. While it shares the “loin” name, it is a completely different cut and comes from a different part of the animal – the back. Pork loins are larger and thicker. Pork loins are roasts, intended to be be cooked low and slow. Because the loin (back) area is large, there are several different loin cuts that you will find at the grocery or butcher, depending if the roast is cut from the end or the centre.

Probably the easiest way to understand the difference is to think of pork the same way you think of beef. Pork tenderloin is equivalent to beef tenderloin – small, tender and meant to be cooked hot and fast. Pork loin roasts are like beef roasts. There are a number of types of roasts, depending on where the cut is from and which one you use will depend on what you are making.

This dish is best suited for a Pork Loin roast and more specifically, a centre-cut pork loin.

Can I make this with a pork tenderloin?

Pork tenderloin will cook much more quickly (probably in about 30 minutes) and to be honest, you will kind of not get the full flavour experience with that short a cooking time, If you prefer to make this with a pork tenderloin, head on over to my recipe for Herb and Garlic Pork Tenderloin, which I adapted from this recipe, but specifically for a pork tenderloin, instead of a pork loin.

To truly enjoy this delicious dish, I highly recommend picking up the larger, lean and boneless pork loin roast.

I made this with a small, centre cut pork loin roast. Look for a pork loin roast that is labeled “center cut”. It is lovely solid, tender meat, with little to no fat in the meat itself. Think of it as the equivalent to a sirloin beef roast. It’s a nice cut when you want a solid, tender slice of pork. Look for one with a little bit of a fat cap (1/2-inch or so) is nice, if you can find that, as it will keep the meat moist and add great flavour to the gravy.

There’s also fresh herbs and while I’m usually flexible with swapping out dried herbs for fresh, this is one recipe where you really want to use fresh. When you smell it cooking, you’ll understand why. Heavenly! And there’s no way that dried herbs can compete with that. It’s worth it just for the smell while it’s cooking, but the way they flavour the meat and the finished gravy is one of the nicest parts of this recipe.

Featured Review: I absolutely agree with your very first comment on this recipe ….this truly is the best pork loin recipe I have ever made. I am cooking it for the second time tonight for dinner. I have an overwhelming desire to make tons of extra sauce and put it on everything. Thanks so much! Alex

Cook’s Notes

I know some people don’t have, drink or cook with wine. If that describes you, this may not be the recipe for you. It has a lot of wine in it and it’s so critical to the flavour, I honestly can’t think of a suitable substitute. This one is all about the wine and fresh herbs.

As for the wine, use a decent one (maybe not the part-bottle that’s been at the back of the fridge for a few weeks and yes, I’ve been guilty of doing that ;) Crack open a fresh bottle, one you love to drink. My son, after tasting this dish, thought a California chardonnay would be a perfect choice. Since he’s the budding sommelier in the family, I’d take that as a solid recommendation, if you don’t already have a favourite white wine you’d like to use.

So now that I’ve said all that, I guess it’s obvious that this isn’t a quick, weeknight meal. That said, it’s not a huge time investment either. It does require peeking at it a few times as it cooks on the stove-top, but other than that, it’s an easy one-pot meal. It’s perfect for a weekend dinner or entertaining.

As for what to serve with it, creamy mashed potatoes would be nice or buttered noodles. I’m tempted to try it with gnocchi too, for some reason. Or forgo the carbs and just enjoy it with a nice green veg.

pork loin with wine and herb gravy sliced on platter

pork loin with wine and herb gravy sliced on platter

Get the Recipe: Pork Loin with Wine and Herb Gravy

Pork loin (or tenderloins) cooked on the stove-top with wine and herbs, then sliced and served with a delicious, lightly creamy gravy. If using a pork loin roast, look for one with a little bit of fat. For pork tenderloins, be sure to trim the silverskin before cooking.
4.96 stars from 90 ratings
Prep Time: 15 mins
Cook Time: 1 hr 30 mins
Total Time: 1 hr 45 mins
Yield: 8 people

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (54.5 ml) olive or vegetable oil
  • 5 cloves (5 cloves) garlic, peeled and sliced in half lengthwise
  • 2 Tbsp (29.57 ml) fresh rosemary leaves, chopped
  • 1/4 cup (8 ml) fresh sage leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 lb (907.18 g) center cut, boneless pork loin roast, *see notes
  • 1 1/4 cups (300 ml) dry white wine, (plus a bit more to deglaze pan)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup (117.5 ml) chicken broth or stock
  • 1/2 cup (119 ml) heavy cream, (or a lighter cream mixed with 2 tsp. cornstarch)

Instructions
 

  • Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven (or similar, heavy-bottomed pan) over medium-high heat.  Saute the pork for about 5 minutes on each side, then remove it to a plate. In the same pan over medium heat, saute the garlic, rosemary and sage, stirring, for about one minute.  Add the wine to the pan and use a wooden spoon to scrape the bottom of the pan. Cook the wine until the smell of the alcohol has disappeared, about 1 to 2 minutes.
  • Lower the heat under the pan to low-medium heat. Return the pork to the pan and season with salt and pepper. Partially cover with a lid and cook for about 1 - 1 1/2 hours, depending on thickness. (considerably less if you're using pork tenderloins). Rely on a thermometer to check for doneness, flipping the pork and scraping the bottom of the pan every 20 minutes or so and measuring the internal temperature with each flipping, to gauge the cooking progress. Make sure there continues to be some liquid in the pan. Add 1/4 cup of warm water if necessary.
  • When the pork is cooked through (ideally, you want to test with a thermometer, it should be about 140°F internal temperature.) Remove pork to a cutting board to rest and cover with loosely with a sheet of aluminum foil to help retain the heat while it rests. 
  • Meanwhile, increase the heat under the liquid in the pan to medium. If your pan has little liquid, deglaze with a splash of white wine. Stir well to loosen the browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Allow to cook until the alcohol smell disappears (about 1-2 minutes). Add the chicken stock and stir to combine. Heat over medium heat a few minutes, to allow the chicken stock to heat through a bit. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add the cream. Heat gently over medium-low heat, stirring the sauce constantly, until it thickens a bit and is warmed through. Avoid vigorously boiling. A gentle simmer is fine. (*If your sauce doesn't thicken up, mix 2 Tbsp. cornstarch with 2 Tbsp. water and add a bit at a time to your sauce until it thickens to your liking.) Taste sauce and add salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste.
  • When the sauce is ready, slice the pork very thinly and place on to a serving platter. Pour the warm gravy over-top to serve.

Notes

Note that this recipe is best made with a pork loin roast, not a pork tenderloin. Pork tenderloins are considerably thinner and cook much more quickly. As such, you won't get the benefit of the low and slow cooking or the flavours that comes from cooking a larger roast.
Be sure to read the "Cook's Notes" in the original post, for more tips, options, substitutions and variations for this recipe!
Cuisine: American
Course: Main Course
Author: Jennifer
Calories: 303kcal, Carbohydrates: 3g, Protein: 26g, Fat: 17g, Saturated Fat: 5g, Cholesterol: 92mg, Sodium: 85mg, Potassium: 495mg, Vitamin A: 290IU, Vitamin C: 0.9mg, Calcium: 40mg, Iron: 1.1mg
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