Homemade Cheese Bread: Two Ways

Homemade Cheese Bread: Two Ways

Delicious soft Homemade Cheese Bread , made two ways – a lovely Cheddar cheese version and a Parmesan and Herb version.

I love to cook new things. I have a cooking queue of new recipes to try that’s a mile long. So many recipes, so little time! So when something makes a repeat performance in my kitchen (or several, in this case), I figure it’s worth sharing.

That’s definitely the case with this Soft Cheese Bread Loaf, first discovered a couple of years ago in Peter Reinhart’s book “Artisan Bread Every Day”. A batch makes two loaves, so I have taken to making two different versions when I make it. Today, it was a Cheddar and Herb and a Parmesan Garlic and Herb.

Now, you might be thinking. “Jen, that bread there isn’t looking so soft”. But trust me, while this bread has a lovely crust, it is a soft crust, along with a soft interior (owing to the milk in the dough, I believe).

Of course, this is a yeast bread, so it doesn’t really qualify as “quick”, but it is easy and with one baking session, you’ll be rewarded with two great and different loaves. And these loaves freeze beautifully, so slice them up and pop them in the freezer and pull some out whenever a side of bread is in order. Pasta night? Toast up some of the Parmesan Garlic Herb (toasting or popping under the broiler for a bit, really brings the flavours out in this one!). Soup night? Cheddar and Herb will go perfectly with it. And of course, either of these would make a great sandwich bread.

My Best Tips for Baking with Yeast

I think most of the problems people have with baking with yeast, is treating yeast-based recipes like say, a cake recipe, where you just measure the ingredients, mix them all together and bake.

Yeast-based recipes just can never be that precise. Things like temperature, moisture in the flour your are using, the season your are baking in and rising time can differ from one kitchen to the next. All that makes yeast recipes less consistent from one kitchen to the next.

Now that you know this though, that’s more than half the battle :) Baking with yeast isn’t just measuring, mixing and baking, like a cake, for example. You’ll need to add to the mix a little trust in what you see (it looks sticky, so it needs more flour, regardless of how much flour the recipe says should go in), and a feel for the dough (does it feel smooth like a baby’s bottom when you’re done kneading?) and watching much it has grown in size as it rises (rather than watching the clock). Do that, and all will be good!

  1. Be careful with the temperature of your proofing liquid before adding the yeast, so you don’t compromise the yeast from the start. If the liquid is too cold, the yeast won’t activate. Too hot and it will die. The best temperature range for proofing liquid is 105-110F for Active Dry Yeast. Instant yeast is a bit more forgiving and can take temperatures up to 120F. All yeasts die at about 140°F. An Instant Read thermometer is handy to have on hand to check.
  2. Always treat the amount of flour specified in yeast-based recipes as “approximate”. Flours will vary from kitchen to kitchen and by season, so the amount needed to make a smooth, soft dough will vary.
  3. Given tip #2, I always hold back 1/4-1/3 of the flour specified in a recipe and add in only as much as is needed. If you dump all the flour in at the start, you may find that it is too much and it’s difficult to adjust well after that.
  4. Use a large glass measuring cup to proof your dough. It’s easy to see when the dough has doubled.
  5. Be patient. Rising times are also “approximate” and will vary as well. Trust what you see and not the clock.

Homemade Cheese Bread: Two Ways

Cook’s Notes for Homemade Cheese Bread

This bread is endlessly customizable. All kinds of cheese, herb and other add-in combinations will work. Want to throw in some sun-dried tomatoes or a bit of pesto? Why not! Olives? Yuck. Sure. Lots of cheese or just a bit? It’s up to you.

Finally, there is an option to overnight-rise this dough in the fridge. I rarely do that, because I’m a) impatient and b) not that organized, but feel free to do so. There’s no doubt that any bread benefits from a longer rise for better flavour.

Video: How to Shape This Cheese Bread

While the shaping for this cheese bread is very easy, the process doesn’t translate easily into words, leaving some room for confusion. To make it easier, I’ve made a quick video that shows the rolling and shaping process for this Cheese Bread recipe …

And here they are, baked and ready to be sliced!

Soft Cheese Bread - Two Ways

Soft Cheese Bread - Two Ways

Soft Cheese Bread: Two Ways

Course: Bread
Cuisine: American, Canadian
Keyword: best cheese bread recipe, homemade cheese bread recipe
Prep Time: 2 hours 20 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 10 minutes
Servings: 24 servings
Energy: 237 kcal
Author: Jennifer

Delicious, soft cheese bread that can be filled with different cheese fillings. If you're measuring your flour in cups, hold back 1 cup to add as needed. This bread freezes beautifully. You can freeze it whole, or slice it and then freeze, so you can grab a couple of slices whenever you like. Makes 2 loaves.

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Ingredients

  • 6 1/2 cups unbleached bread flour can use all purpose, if that's all you have (28oz)
  • 2 tsp fine salt (0.5oz) or 1 Tbsp. coarse kosher salt
  • 5 Tbsp white sugar (2.25oz) or 5 Tbsp brown sugar or 3 1/2 Tbsp. honey or agave nectar
  • 1 cup lukewarm water (8oz) about 95F (for even softer bread, use 1 cup water leftover from boiling potatoes, cooled)
  • 1 cup plus 2 Tbsp lukewarm buttermilk (9oz) or milk
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp instant yeast (0.5oz)
  • 1/4 cup melted unsalted butter (2oz) or vegetable oil

Cheddar and Herb (to make one loaf):

  • 2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup minced herbs (parsley and chives are good choices)

Parmesan, Garlic and Herb (to make one loaf):

  • 1 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder (or about 2 tsp. minced fresh garlic)
  • 1/4 cup minced herbs (parsley works well)
  • 1/4 cup butter, at room temperature

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flour, salt and sugar* together. (Tip: If measuring your flour in cups, without a scale, hold back 1 cup to add as needed later). *If you're using honey or agave, add with the liquid ingredients instead.
  2. In a large measuring cup or bowl, combine the water and buttermilk and whisk in the yeast until dissolved. Add this mixture, along with the melted butter, to the dry ingredients. Mix by hand or with a dough hook, until the mixture is combined, about 2 minutes. Let the dough rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Continue mixing the dough, adding more flour or water, as needed, until the dough becomes soft, smooth and tacky, but not sticky.
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead for a couple of minutes, then form dough into a ball. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and either refrigerate for up to 4 days, or allow to sit at room temperature until doubled in size (about 60-90 minutes). (*Tip: I like to use an 8-cup glass measuring cup, so it's easy to see when it's doubled by the markings).
  5. Note: If you have refrigerated your dough, remove from the refrigerator 2 hours before you plan to bake, to allow it to come to room temperature.
  6. Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces. Dust each with a bit of flour and then, using a rolling pin, roll into a rectangle approximately 10 inches wide and 16 inches long.
  7. **See original post "Cook's Notes" for a video that demonstrates the rolling and shaping process for this cheese bread.** 

  8. For the Cheddar and Herb Bread: spread shredded cheddar and herbs evenly over the surface of the dough. Starting with the shortest side, roll the dough up jelly-roll style and pinch the seam together.
  9. For the Parmesan, Garlic and Herb: spread the softened butter over the surface of the dough. Sprinkle evenly with Parmesan, garlic and herbs. Press lightly with the palm of your hand to press the toppings into the butter. Starting with the shortest side, roll the dough up jelly-roll style and pinch the seam together.
  10. Grease two 8-inch by 4-inch loaf pans and set aside.
  11. Shaping: Using a sharp knife, cut the roll of dough down the centre, lengthwise. Rotate each piece so that the cut sides are facing upward and place them side-by-side. Pinch together the farthest end. Keeping the cuts sides facing upwards as much as possible, place the right-side piece over the left-side piece. Straighen it up and then repeat, pinching together the end closest to you. If any cheese escapes, just place it back on top. Using a bench scraper or spatula, carefully lift the dough into the greased loaf pan. Repeat with the other dough log, then cover both with a greased piece of plastic wrap and allow to rise until the dough rises to about 1-inch above the side of the pans in the middle.
  12. Preheat oven to 350° F. Bake for 45-50 minutes total, but after 25 minutes of baking, rotate pans front-to-back in the oven and loosely cover with a piece of aluminum foil if necessary (if bread is already well-browned), to prevent the top from over-browning. Bread should reach about 185° internal temperature in the centre.

  13. Remove the bread from the oven and allow to cool in the pans for a couple of minutes. Run a sharp knife around the edge of the bread and carefully remove the loaves to a cooling rack. Allow to cool for 1 hour before slicing.

Recipe Video

Recipe Notes

Be sure to read the "Cook's Notes" in the original post, for more tips, options, substitutions and variations for this recipe!

 

More Homemade Cheese Bread Loaf Recipes from Seasons and Suppers

 

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260 Comments



  • I made the cheese and herb. I also added pizza sauce and ham to one loaf and switched out half the cheddar for mozzarella.

  • I just found you on pinterest and I’m so excited to follow your blog. I love all the recipes on your site, and it will be hard to decide which to make first! Thanks!

  • This bread looks wonderful and I’m itching to make it. I wonder if you could help as I’m a little confused as to the yeast measurement. When you say “1 1/2 tbsp instant yeast”, do you mean one and a half tbsp or just one half of a tablespoon? Sorry if this seems to be a silly question. Here in Scotland I think we may read quantities a little differently – well at least I do. Many thanks.

    • Not silly at all. For the yeast, it is one and a half tablespoons, so you would add 1 tablespoon + plus 1 1/2 teaspoons. Hope you enjoy the bread!

    • Hi Mel, Sure. It would be fine. It’s a mildly sweet and soft bread, with or without fillings. It was be fine plain for sandwiches or toast.

  • oh gosh, i cannot wait to do this and i have bookmarked it! i tried a cheese bread 2 wks ago and it turned out to be very oily and heavy. Not soft at all and i could not go on after the 2nd slice…

    i will make this definitely!

  • Hi Jennifer, these photos look great! I love making bread and I’m going to make them this weekend. I’m having trouble visualizing how you assemble the dough, in order to get the beautiful swirl effect. Any chance you can elaborate on the process for me? Sorry to be a pain, but I don’t want to mess it up!
    Thanks! Sandra

    • Hi Sandra and it’s not problem at all. It was only after I made it last that I thought it would have been helpful to photograph the shaping thing. I plan to add it to the post the next time I make it. In the meantime, I’ve attached here a picture of shaping Estonian Kringle bread, which is very similar, except we won’t be able to get as many twists out of ours and we’re not going to form it in to a ring at the end.


      Image © My Recipe Journey

      So basically, we are going to spread the filling over the rolled out dough and then roll up jelly-roll style and pinch together. With a sharp knife, you’ll slice down the centre of the log, lengthwise and then rotate the pieces so the exposed filling is facing upwards. Pinch together the far end, then twist the two pieces together a couple of times, making sure to keep the exposed filling side facing up. Pinch together the other end once you’ve twisted it together (you’ll probably only be able to twist it 2-3 times). Carefully lift twisted loaf into greased loaf pan.

      Does that help?

  • I was just wondering if you had to let the yeast activate before you add it to the dry ingredients or if you just dump it all in together?

    • Hi Kristin, This recipe calls for instant yeast, which doesn’t need to be proofed in liquid beforehand. If you used active dry yeast, yes, you should activate it with some of the liquid before adding.

I love hearing from you, so if you have a question or something isn't quite clear, I'm happy to help. If you made this recipe, I'd love to know how you liked it ~ Jennifer

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